MAMO♥

Oct 01

anitathefreak:

Read the full article click Here !

Things that could only happen in a Hong Kong protest


Oct 01

12.15am: Some images just in from our photographer Dickson Lee who is in Admiralty, where tens of thousands are still gathered. The signs in the second photograph read “Be alert” and “Don’t forget the objective”.


Oct 01

yeyinshiya:

- A truck driver voluntarily came to Admiralty to collect the trash and recyclable wastes at 8:20 p.m.

- Protesters cleaning the streets after the rain.

BTW, cleaning equipments and materials needed in all stations!!!!

Photo Source: Apple Daily News/ Live photo

{Please spread and save as record, in case police are clearing out the media}

{If you care and know any second language, please help and translate the post.}


Sep 30

A Real Look Into The Hong Kong Umbrella Revolution.

lanitao:

I’ve had so many concerned friends from around the world recently message me, concerned for my safety in Hong Kong. This post is to show my dear friends, and those from around the world what its actually like here in Hong Kong at this moment. 

Background: 

For anyone that doesnt understand what is going on, very quickly is that after the 1997 handover of HK from British rule to China it was promised that 2017 HK would be allowed a democratic vote of its own leader. However in August it was announced from Beijing that yes the 5 million eligible voters would be able to vote for their own leader, BUT from a preapproved pool of candidates picked by Beijing. This meant that these candidates would most likely be pro China. HK has been promised a special administrative region status, One country Two systems. The people of HK saw this as a betrayal and not a true democracy as promised, as was their right. 

The student movement to protest for this cause, to get the same democracy that we so luckily have in the West began last week, and over the weekend were joined by Occupy Central. It must be noted that they are two groups, but fighting for the same cause basically. Everyone wanted this outcome of a true democratic vote by peaceful means. No one protesting damaged any property, set any cars on fire, nor had weapons. What made this escalate so greatly was when the HK police fired tear gas and began pepper spraying everyone. The people of HK (unlike China) have a right to protest in public, and allowed this freedom of speech. There was no reason for the police to use violence, to resort to pepper spraying, shooting rubber bullets into the crowd. It must be noted though, that not all the police are horrid, and that they do have to follow orders from above as that is their job, but I believe there should have been better ways to handle the situation. So nonetheless, these are some main points of what turned this into Hong Kong biggest protest in decades, and being compared to 1989 Tiananmen. This is the Umbrella Revolution. 

Why is it called Umbrella Revolution? One, it is a mix because HK weather is in typhoon season and it often rains, so having an umbrella is crucial. However, when police used pepper spray, the same umbrellas were used by the protestors to shield themselves, and the day afterwards in the scorching hear these umbrellas were used to protect from the sun. Hence the cheeky name Umbrella Revolution. 

Today I got a chance to go down there and see for myself what it was like. From the news coverage around the world that I had seen, it seemed like it was utter massacre and destruction in Central. No wonder people were worried. The looped videos of police pepper spraying the old, the screaming and outcries of the people as police force came upon them. So at 4pm when I wandered into the streets of central (note that buses and public transportation dont go that far off, and all highways are now occupied by protesters) expecting the worst. However was I greatly mistaken. This was the most moving peaceful protest I had ever seen. Within steps of reaching the protest areas people came up and asked us if we needed any water, water stations set up area, food stations, makeshift first aid station (no one injured was there), and people peacefully gathered in all areas. Majority of which were students, just sitting around, talking to each other, on their phones, and even studying for exams! 

Let me take you through this photo journey so you have a real understanding of what its like in this protest.image

Streets in Admiralty begin to be blocked. No cars and traffic can come through. Even tunnels were blocked by these barricades.

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Lets not forget this is Central Hong Kong, one of the major business hubs of the world.. on a standstill. 

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A lot of students sitting on the main highway. 

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The students organized plenty of water stations so everyone could stay hydrated. Hong Kong is still pretty damn hot right now. 

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Umbrellas for anyone who would need them, especially if those who were deciding to go to the front line if anything were to get rough again. 

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Pop up first aid tents. Even Red Cross Hong Kong who’s office was by the protest site had opened up its door for first aid help. 

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Signs like this could be seen everywhere. Even in other languages. 

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Yellow ribbons were given out to show the support and fight for democracy. Also note that blue ribbons (not as commonly scene on site) are handed out or used on facebook profiles to show the support for the police. 

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Bin areas to help keep the streets clean. Volunteers, the students would go around with these bags to help clean up any trash left behind. 

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Supply stations. Everyone understood that you take only what was needed. 

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imageAnd the crowd begins to form in Admiralty. 

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And a lot of signs to try and showcase their emotions and voices

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And again, this is how organized it is. Recycling separation stations. 

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Tired protesters on the sides of the highways. 

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This guy here was handing out cooling pads that people put over their foreheads to fight the heat.

imageYellow ribbons tied to the gates of the Central Government Office where a lot of the protests have centralized. 

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Umbrellas that have served its purpose

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These protests have been chanting for a change through peaceful non violent means. Everywhere you can see that its asking people to not be violent, there are signs even that say DO NOT GRAFFITI. They are not doing anything wrong. They have the right to protest in public spaces. The atmosphere is amazing, and so moving. To see this many people come together to fight for a cause and fighting for their future, through non violent means. They want their voices to be heard. They want the world to know that they just want to same kind of democracy that we take for granted. 

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Even as it began to be dark, there were no signs of these guys going anywhere. 

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Its hard to tell in the picture, but we did end up getting caught up in a very short freak rainstorm. Umbrellas started coming out, and while we didnt have any umbrellas with us, all the people around us sheltered us with theirs and quickly gave us garbage bags to protect ourselves and tissues to dry ourselves. All they said was “Thank you for supporting us!” 

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And as night fell, Hong Kong being a city of smartphones, everyone took them out and in unison and shone their lights. It was surreal to see, everywhere as far as the eye could reach were these bright specs of lights, waving in the air, and chants of “jia you” (direct translation add oil, or meaning best of luck or keep going) and “Hong Kong” could be heard. Cheers, chants, singing continued. I’ve never been in a place that was so orderly and peaceful even when protesting, yes the media has shown the rioting and tear gases, but for the other 90% of the time, its just people gathered wanting the goverment to feel the pressure that they cant be denied their rights, and showing that people coming together do have power and influence. I dont know what Beijing will do. In my opinion, they are in a hard place because the entire world is watching their move and for them give HK exactly what they want shows that they are losing power and let a protest overrule them, meaning next time people will just protest again. And Beijing cant have that. They need to maintain their power. CY Leung is feeling the pressure. The Chief Executive of Hong Kong. His is a name people wont forget. But not for the better. The numbers 689 can be seen, showing the number of votes that he had received. I think that despite what happens, because I truly dont know what will, Hong Kong now has the world watching, showing that they cant be stepped on and they will fight for their rights. And that in itself is a success. So dear friends, theres no danger. Take what media shows with a grain of salt. Its just majority of students, the feared upon millenials stretching their wings. 

This is the city that I live in. This is the city that is fighting for democracy. This is the city that wants to be heard. This is the city fighting for their voices to be heard. This is the Umbrella Revolution. This is Hong Kong.


Sep 30
dramapot:

2013.09.30 @ Admiralty, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok
Thank you Tumblrians.
Last night I posted this pic. I can’t believe there’re over 6000 likes/reblogs, from Tumblrians all over the world. Sure, not everyone agreed or understood the meaning behind it, but it doesn’t matter. If the old lady gave you a little glimmer of hope, then it already achieved its purpose.
I posted the same pic on Instagram. Within minutes two people started arguing. The details of which I won’t go into, but essentially, her argument was:

Before the handover, Hong Kong couldn’t elect their own Governor anyway! He was chosen by the British government! Why are you people complaining now? Stop causing trouble!

The answer could be as simple as - because it was promised to the people. 
But of course, life is complicated. I cannot speak for everyone in Hong Kong, but in the years since the handover, we have seen some of our basic human rights slowly eroded away.
We ARE NOT SEEKING INDEPENDENCE. I think this is an important point since some people assume protest = revolution = independence. We’re simply asking for our voice to be heard.
We want to express our views freely. 
We don’t want to live behind the Great Firewall of China where sites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are blocked. 
We want our children to read about the truth in textbooks, not state sanctioned propaganda.  
We want to preserve our language - Cantonese. 
We want our journalists to report without fear of persecution. 
We want the rule of law - that corrupt officials be prosecuted, not ignored.
The views above are mine, if you do not agree - you can express your view but I won’t get into an argument with anyone. That will be in opposition of why all those people are on the streets right now.

dramapot:

2013.09.30 @ Admiralty, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok

Thank you Tumblrians.

Last night I posted this pic. I can’t believe there’re over 6000 likes/reblogs, from Tumblrians all over the world. Sure, not everyone agreed or understood the meaning behind it, but it doesn’t matter. If the old lady gave you a little glimmer of hope, then it already achieved its purpose.

I posted the same pic on Instagram. Within minutes two people started arguing. The details of which I won’t go into, but essentially, her argument was:

Before the handover, Hong Kong couldn’t elect their own Governor anyway! He was chosen by the British government! Why are you people complaining now? Stop causing trouble!

The answer could be as simple as - because it was promised to the people. 

But of course, life is complicated. I cannot speak for everyone in Hong Kong, but in the years since the handover, we have seen some of our basic human rights slowly eroded away.

We ARE NOT SEEKING INDEPENDENCE. I think this is an important point since some people assume protest = revolution = independence. We’re simply asking for our voice to be heard.

We want to express our views freely.

  • We don’t want to live behind the Great Firewall of China where sites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram are blocked. 

  • We want our children to read about the truth in textbooks, not state sanctioned propaganda.  

  • We want to preserve our language - Cantonese. 

  • We want our journalists to report without fear of persecution. 

  • We want the rule of law - that corrupt officials be prosecuted, not ignored.

The views above are mine, if you do not agree - you can express your view but I won’t get into an argument with anyone. That will be in opposition of why all those people are on the streets right now.


Sep 30

yeyinshiya:

Thanks you van drivers and private car owner for guarding the protesters.

Y I thank them?

Last night (this morning) at around 2a.m. a certain private car attempt to hit and run towards the protesters at high speed in Mong Kok. (Plz go and have a look on my previous posts). Later that night, these van drivers and car owners are parking their car here as road blocks to prevent cars from charging towards the supporters.

Rumours about a certain triad society boss

Some members are quarrelling with police last night , boss bringing resources to supporters in a LV bag and said to his bros,  ”That place is for students. We move back to where we belong.” Then left, smiling to the protesters.   

{Please spread and save as record, in case police are clearing out the media}

{If you care and know any second language, please help and translate the post.}


Sep 30
Thunder, rain fail to dampen spirits of Hong Kong democracy protesters. (x)

Sep 30

lovatic4everdemi3:

This is what happen these few days in my school. Our school has always been very strict and traditional. We have to briad our hair into two parts in the same way everyday, we are not allowed to even wear earrings but our school let us put on the yellow ribbon.

Out of over 800 students, over 100 students from form 1 to form 6 (7th to 12th grade) has skip classes to state their feelings and determination towards getting a real public election.

Yes, we are young but we are powerful. So is everyone, I believe together, we can force the China to take back the decisions they made and let the public get what they deserve/want.

As a Hongkonger myself, I know this is a hard and difficult road for all of us Hongkongers. But we are not giving up. So please spread the word and help Hongkongers to get what we deserve, help us to get our freedom back. Thank you.


Sep 30

Updates on Occupy Central (30/9)

claimthatbooty:

At 1:53, a private car drove at high speed non-stop toward protesters at a crossroad in Mong Kok. No one is hurt. The police tracked down the owner of the car, however the driver claimed that he was using the road legally. He did not consume any alcohol. When the incident happened, there were little to no police officers at Mong Kok. You could read more about it here.

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Later when the Mong Kok Station Sergant was interviewed about the lack of police force, he stated that the police is the servants of the public and is not very welcome now as he evaded the question.

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via TVB news

At 4:20 pm, the Chief Superintendent of Police Hui met the press, saying that when police officers went to Mong Kok to investigate the incident mentioned above, the police could not arrive in the shortest time possible because of the road block the protesters set up, and that being surrounded by protesters affected the investigation. 

When asked about the police showing the “Disperse or we fire” flag to protesters, Hui said the police did not show said flag to protesters. As the reporters insisted, he said the police merely wanted to warn protesters about the use of tear gas, and the protesters may have seen the flag due to the flag having two sides. The following shows the police showing the flag to protesters, taken by press on the internet.

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via 謎米

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via iammedia.net’s Facebook page

The Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, known as CY, stated that the protest affected some of the first-aid service, delaying patients on their trip to the hospitals when he was meeting the press at 9:40 a.m..However, at 11:12 a.m., the chairperson of Hong Kong Fire Services Department Ambulancemen’s Union Chan Si-kei said there were no reports of first-aid services being delayed due to the protest. He received similar news on whatsapp groups, but was unable to determine the legitimacy. There are rumours about similar incidents, for example, a whatsapp showing that a pregnant woman couldn’t get to Ruttonjee Hospital in time due to traffic congestion caused by the protest, causing the baby girl born died because her brain lacked oxygen. There is also another version on the Facebook Page “Salute to Hong Kong Police”, saying after he congratulates his friend’s baby girl being born, his friend replied that his wife’s trip to Ruttonjee Hospital took  5 hours due to traffic congestion caused by the protest. His daughter’s brain lacked oxygen and may be mentally disabled. After the message(s) went viral, the Hospital Authority confirmed with Ruttonjee Hospital that there were no such incidents. Also, it was proved by netizens that there are no delivery suite in Ruttonjee Hospital

According to Scholarism, a Hong Kong student activist group leading Occupy Central Movement, the protest today was very peaceful to such an extent that is worrying. The ratio of police to protesters is very low, leading to a lot of people thinking this is the police’s strategy to lower the protesters’ alertness and conduct a even larger scale of clearing the area. The fact that tomorrow is the national day of China makes Hong Kong people even more concerned and nervous. //18:38 HKT

**Please note that all of the above are my rough translations from news and what I see from protesters’ posts on Facebook.**


Sep 30

Thank you Mamo it’s amazing to know the live title is AMAZING! 

Reminded me I got some Mamo related asks to answer, will answer slowly (as a little break from the HK news) //exits network for a while


Tagged: personal~
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